The Cropper Foundation’s 8th Residential Creative Writers’ Workshop is now open for applications – Deadline Dec 15th

THE CROPPER FOUNDATION’s 8th Residential Creative Writers Workshop is now open for applications.

The Workshop sponsored by The Cropper Foundation, and organised in partnership with the Department of Creative and Festival Arts, University of the West Indies, St Augustine, will take place from June 29th to July 13th 2014 in Trinidad and Tobago. Applications are open to published or unpublished prose fiction writers, as well as poets and playwrights.

Two experienced and published authors — Professor Funso Aiyejina and Dr Merle Hodge from the University of the West Indies will be the residential moderators for the two-week workshop. Since 2000 they have mentored writers from Antigua, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, British Virgin Islands, Commonwealth of Dominica, St. Lucia, Guyana, Jamaica, Montserrat, Puerto Rico, Trinidad and Tobago, and the Caribbean Diaspora (Canada, USA, France), many of whom have gone on to publish their original creative writing and won a number of international Literary Awards.
The writers’ workshop is part of The Cropper Foundation’s effort to contribute to the development of the Caribbean on many levels and in different areas of interest.

Participants of the Residential Creative Writers Workshop will also benefit from visits and discussions with published authors and professionals from the publishing industry.
Interested writers are invited to submit five pages of a sample of their prose fiction, plays or their poetry no later than December 15th, 2013 to the following address: Writers Workshop, Department of Creative & Festival Arts, The University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad. All applicants (above the age of twenty) are responsible for their travel to and from Trinidad, and will be asked to contribute US$500 or TT$3000 each for the two week workshop. For application forms and further information, call Dani Lyndersay or Sherry-Ann Carrington at the UWI Department of the Creative and Festival Arts, telephone:
(1 868) 662-2002 (ext. 83539/83539/83791 ); fax: (1 868) 663 2222; or email:
danielle.lyndersay@sta.uwi.edu; or sherry-ann.carrington @sta.uwi.edu — Subject: Writers’ workshop or visit The Cropper Foundation’s website at http://www.cropperfoundation.org or download the application form HERE.

http://cropperfoundation.wordpress.com/2013/11/13/the-cropper-foundations-8th-residential-creative-writers-workshop-is-now-open-for-applications/

Small Axe Literary Competition Open for 2013

The Small Axe Literary Competition encourages the production and publication of Caribbean fiction and poetry. The competition focuses on poetry and short stories from emerging writers whose work centers on regional and diasporic Caribbean themes and concerns. This competition is part of the Small Axe Project’s ongoing commitment to Caribbean cultural production and our mission to provide a forum for innovative critical and creative explorations of Caribbean reality. With this competition, we hope to encourage and support the region’s rich literary heritage, in the tradition of precursors such as BimKyk-over-al, Focus and Savacou.

The competition consists of two categories: poetry and short fiction. Two winners are chosen from each category by a distinguished panel of judges. First Prize: $750 Second Prize: $500. 2013 Competition submission deadline: 31 May, 2013

Winners of the 2012 competition will be published in Small Axe 42 – July 2013.

 

http://arcthemagazine.com/arc/2013/04/small-axe-literary-competition-open-for-2013/

Senseisha: It’s About Our Several Splendid Stories

Yesterday having been UK World Book Day (US World Book Day is usually celebrated in October and this year is being highlighted on April 23rd  – a Tale of Two Worlds, but that’s for another post) and today being International Day of Women it seems a perfect time to reflect a little on the stories of women, particularly in this region of the world.

Although over half the world’s population and fully part of humanity, most of the voices heard and stories told throughout history have been given from a male perspective, explicitly or implicitly. It is largely within the past few generations that women’s voices have risen to the fore and are being considered as “worthy” to be told – not because of who they are being told to, but because they are worth being heard. Queen Scheherazade is more than just a soothing entertainer for her King for a thousand and one nights.

Yet still there is need for more. Who can tell a woman’s story as well as the woman herself? Authenticity, vulnerability, raw truth, beneath the make-up and petticoats. And there is not just One Story for all women. There are as many as there are faces and fingers and feet.

This is especially true for women in the Caribbean. When coming up with the concept of Senseisha we tried to find common Caribbean language to capture the sense of empowered,   positively sexual, body & spirit-wise women. Sadly most of the terms we came across were anything but. Our folk tales, calypsos, dub, jokes and idioms are full of references to women, but mostly as a Scheherazade (bedtime entertainment for men), a Delilah (a dangerous temptress who saps men of their strength), a Jezebel (a sly lover who robs a man of his wits) or, as Red Rat once put it, a Shelly-ann (an easy sexual conquest). The strong, wise women are usually mother or grandmother figures, stripped of any semblance of sexuality.

In the end we decided to make our own words and add to the lexicon; hence “senseisha”.

Senseisha: Memoirs of The Caribbean Woman is about the stories that are often left untold; women raising their voices outside of the realm of male fantasy and fear to say this is who we are, this is how we feel, these are the experiences that have made us giggle, laugh, cry, curse, coo and climax.

Continue reading

Helen Isobel Sissons Canadian Children’s Story Award – Deadline March 22nd

 P.A.C.E (Canada) is now accepting submissions to the Helen Isobel Sissons Canadian Children’s Story Award. This award is a cash grant of $1,000 and is intended to encourage the development of literature for young children.
Helen Isobel Sissons was committed to human rights and equity. She contributed a great deal to the initiatives taken by the Toronto school system to make the city a welcoming environment for immigrant and refugee children and their parents during the challenging seventies and eighties.
Awards Criteria and Submission Guidelines
– Unpublished up to the time of application
– Written by a resident of Canada or the Caribbean
– Have special appeal for children up to seven years of age
– Reflect the diversity of the world’s population and values desirable in global citizens
Manuscript Submission Guidelines
– Length should be appropriate to the genre of the story and the age of the children for whom the story is written.
– If illustrations are central to the storyline, a brief description of these should be included with the manuscript. Please do not include original artwork.
Deadline: Friday March 22, 2013.
Full submission guidelines here.

Advertising Your Book on a Budget

by Lyndon Baptiste

I like giving away books more than I like the idea of spending money on advertising because I believe if a product is good enough it will sell itself. But in December 2012, for Potbake’s fourth birthday, we decided to offer free ebooks and spend no more than USD 100.00 advertising the offering. It sounds strange right: Avertising something that’s free? But I’ve since learnt that not because something is free means people will know about it. Imagine you’re in the grocery and you walk along all the aisles except the one where they happen to be giving out free samples of a wine or snack you really want to taste.

So, we had an offer and we knew our max budget, but I didn’t have a plan except to run the ads on Facebook and Google and share posts, tweets and pictures on Google+, Twitter and Instagram on the actual days of the offering. When I mentioned this to dad, he gave me something to think about: do movies just show up one day in the cinema? I thought about it and two weeks before I created an article on potbake.com promoting the offering (which turned out to be a great thing because as it turns out advertising an external URL on Facebook was a lot cheaper than an actual Facebook post; compare USD 0.05 to USD 0.65). We shared the link on the different channels we mentioned, got Retweets, Likes, Shares and +1s. Randy Baker was kind enough to post an article on the 15 December mentioning the free books. Then we scheduled campaigns on Facebook and Google with ads that linked to our website article rather than the links to the books on Amazon.com. This was important in terms of measuring the traffic the campaigns generated. If you’re an author or publisher it’s a pretty good idea to have a website, Facebook Page, Twitter, Google+, Instagram, Tumblr and Pinterest account. This isn’t vanity and there’s no need to daily slave after maintaining these accounts, but you need to connect with as many people possible. I went along with no clear plan but hopefully the madness might make sense. The first step was to enrol the book in Amazon’s KDP Select which facilitates 5 days of free promotion and allows Select Members to borrow the book for free.

Advertising on Facebook

The first thing I learnt is that you can’t advertise to the people of the world. You need to have some idea of who might be interested, what’s their age, where are they from.  For example, I needed to advertise to folks who have some interest in an Amazon Kindle. But registering that interest to the world may yield a result in the millions so I targeted the people of the Caribbean interested in Amazon.com, the Kindle or Kindle Fire. Note: If the books were for sale, I wouldn’t have advertised to people with these interests between the ages of 13 and 17. While they might be interested, they would have less buying power. But the books were free. I included teenagers. Figure 1 shows that an audience of 105,580 from the Caribbean fit this profile.

To continue reading, go to:

http://www.potbake.com/potbake/news/read/newsId/34

St Somewhere Fiction Anthology – Deadline August 1st 2013

St. Somewhere Press is currently accepting submissions for “Things & Time”, a book length, short story anthology, to be released in 2013. Deadline for submissions is August 1, 2013. Projected publication date is October of 2013. This anthology of short fiction will be published in electronic book form, spanning multiple formats.

We are seeking original, unpublished fiction with a direct thematic connection to the Caribbean, or the Caribbean Diaspora. Accepted works must not have been previously published in print or digitally (online or e-book formats). All genres are welcome, as long as they meet the previously stated criteria of a connection to the Caribbean or Caribbean Diaspora. Simultaneous submissions are not accepted.

Please submit short fiction of 3,000 to 6,000 words, as an email attachment. Email submissions only will be accepted. Failure to comply with requested word count or to provide submission as an attachment will result in automatic disqualification. Your submission should be single spaced, with block paragraph formatting.  You may send multiple submissions, but only one per email.

Send your submissions to submissions@stsomewherepress.com with the subject line: Submission – Fiction Anthology. Include your name, email address and a brief bio in both the body of your email and in the attached document.

No monetary compensation is being offered for this anthology. Upon publication, contributing authors will be given unlimited access to download electronic copies of the anthology for a two week period of time.

Upon acceptance, St. Somewhere Press assumes first serial rights to all submissions. The copyright automatically reverts to author upon publication. All work may be permanently archived online by St. Somewhere Press and St. Somewhere Press retains the non-exclusive rights to republish accepted works in alternate, or new, formats. Any subsequent publication of accepted works by their authors must properly cite St. Somewhere Press as the original publisher of the work.

http://stsomewherepress.blogspot.com/p/submissions.html
http://www.stsomewherepress.com/