Too Many Ideas Syndrome (TMIS)

Last night I dreamed about a movie.

It was one of my favourites because it is so brilliant – a fantasy movie with poignant main characters, and twisted plots which shocked and angered me. The antagonist was so cruel that I skipped ahead of some of the worse scenes. I never remember the name of the movie, but when I was dreaming the plot came back so easily. It was an old movie – think back to a time when you watched a TNT movie on that old six-channel STV box.

While I was dreaming I said to myself, “I need to look up the name of this movie because I keep forgetting what happens. It’s been a while since I watched it.”

So I wake up, yawn, and turn on the computer. I look out the window – it is a sunny Saturday yay! Now what do I have to do today again? I go on Facebook, check the emails, read a funny Cracked article (I love that site) and then I remember about the movie.

I open the Google search engine, and then I pause. I realise I have no idea what to google.

Then it hit me.

DAMMIT TO HELL (not the words I used) IT ISN’T A REAL MOVIE!

IT WAS A DREAM! Continue reading

Etc Caraibe Playwriting Competition

Etc_caraïbe, whose goals are to discover, train, promote and support Caribbean playwrights, launches its third Playwriting Competition.

Prizes: grants, artists residencies, publishing and creation support.

Beaumarchais prize: awarded to a French speaking playwright (2 500€ grant, 1000€ publishing support, 5 000€ creation support)

Ville de Paris second prize: awarded to a non-French speaking Caribbean playwright (1 000€ grant subject to a month writing residency in Guadeloupe). Readings of the laureate’s text will be held in his/her presence on October 2014 , during the Festival de Limoges (France).

Marius Gottin third prize: awarded to a creole speaking Caribbean playwright (1300€ grant)
Submit your curriculum vitae, contact information, play synopsis and the first 20 dialogue pages of your script to :
Email : etc_caraibe@yahoo.com

*PDF
Artistic director: Danielle Vendé

Top 50 Literary Magazines

 Taken from: http://www.everywritersresource.com/topliterarymagazines.html

 Find a complete listing of literary magazines here.

Our criteria for this list has changed and we feel the literary magazines on this list are much better ranked than our previous list. It’s always hard to build this list, but we looked about close to 20 data points in coming up with this list. The most important criteria we used this time was date of founding, number of national anthologies publications (and we looked at a lot of them), and the quality of work of and names of passed greats published in the magazines.

The purpose of this list is to help writers find a place to publish their writing that will get them some recognition. We feel when a magazine is published over a long period of time and is recognized nationally we feel it gives the authors more opportunity for exposure. Also these magazines tend to have a very good name in literary circles. We know that many will not agree fully, and some will feel we’ve left a good or great publication off the list. That’s okay. The best thing to do is go to our message boards and post your opinion under our top 50 boards and make a case for adding it to this list.

This list also includes BOLD type where literary magazines take online submissions. We feel this is an important step for a magazine to take. We feel that by taking submissions online magazines are opening themselves up to many more voices and have a better opportunity to find new talent that we want to read. To this end, we have a suggestion. Go down this list and pick out a literary magazine that takes online submissions. Go to their site and submit your work. Also while you are there buy a subscription. Support those who support writers.

 

  1. New Yorker http://www.newyorker.com
  • The best of the best. We didn’t have any commercial magazines on our last list, but it was a shame to leave this literary magazine out. After lots of emails here it is one the oldest and the most honored magazine of all. Started in the 1920s and has a circulation of over a million readers. Online submissionshttp://www.newyorker.com/contact/contactus Continue reading