More Erotica & Me

In November 2012 I featured an interview with Eve Seymour, a new Caribbean writer of Erotica. Her rambunctious tale, Broken Rules puts her firmly in line to become the foremost Caribbean writer of Erotica. (Those of you who’ve read the book, please correct me if I’m wrong!)

Now, please allow me to introduce you to the work of Robert E. Sandiford, whom I consider the foremost Caribbean writer of Erotica at this time.

Robert E. is no newcomer on the local, regional and international scenes. Journalist, essayist, biographer, short story writer, novelist, video producer and editor extraordinaire, he is one of Barbados’s top contemporary writers.

To date he’s written and had published short story collections, essays, his memoirs, and (my favourite!) a series of erotic graphic novels: Attractive ForcesStray Moonbeams and Great Moves.

Continue reading at:

More Erotica & Me.

Structuring Your Screenplay

It’s easy to lose your way when writing, especially in Act II. Here’s the diagram that I use to help me control the plot and structure of a full length feature film. This technique is all courtesy of Syd Field, the master of screenwriting. I would encourage everyone to read his books “The Screenplay” or “The Screenwriter’s Workbook”.

Do the story arc.

syd field paradigm
Right so Syd Field uses a story called “The Unhappy Marriage”. A young woman, a painter in an unhappy marriage, enrols in an art class and has an affair with her teacher. Against her will she falls in love with him, then learns she is pregnant. Torn between her husband and her lover, she decides to leave them both and raise the child by herself.

ACT ONE
This is the setup act, where we learn what the story is about, who the characters are, and why we care about them. Your main character is normally in every scene, and we go through “a day in her life”. So for instance, in this story we could portray the unhappy marriage with a scene of them eating breakfast in silence, sleeping in separate bedrooms, arguing etc. The woman, let’s call her Mary, is a painter, so maybe we could see her releasing her frustration through painting. The TP1 (Turning Point One) occurs when she enrols into the art class. This is the inciting incident; the moment where your main character’s life could never be the same. If we’re writing a 100 page script, then Act One should be approx. 25 pages.

Continue reading

St Somewhere Journal

Now accepting submissions for April 2013. 
Deadline March 1, 2013

Submission Guidelines

St. Somewhere Journal is published quarterly. New issues will be released in January, April, July and October. We accept English language submissions for publication in our online journal. Works written in English lexicon dialect/creole are also encouraged, as well as translations. Submissions are accepted via email only.

We welcome all genres, though we lean toward what is typically referred to as literary. The Caribbean region is our primary focus, with secondary emphasis on works with an international or general appeal. Work that has a strong connection to these areas, either literally or philosophically, has the best chance of acceptance. However, quality carries its own weight, regardless of subject matter.

Fiction: Please submit short fiction of 5,000 words or less. Submit your fiction as an attached document or in the body of your email. We prefer a web-friendly format, meaning that we’d appreciate it if you’d single space your paragraphs and double space between paragraphs, with no indentations.

Poetry: Any form is acceptable. Unlike some publications, we have no particular bias for or against rhyming poetry or free verse. Send no more than 5 poems, single spaced in the body of your email.

Essay: Please submit essays of 5,000 words or less. Submit your essay as an attached document, or in the body of your email. We prefer a web-friendly format (see above under “fiction”). For our purposes, we consider an essay to be literary, film or cultural criticism, book reviews or creative non-fiction.

Visual Art: Submissions of visual art will be accepted and considered for use as cover art for our publication, as well as interior art. Scanned images of visual works are acceptable, as well as photography. For photography that includes identifiable individuals, you must be able to provide a copy of a signed model release form. Please submit your art work as an attachment in .jpg format.

Continue reading

St Somewhere Fiction Anthology – Deadline August 1st 2013

St. Somewhere Press is currently accepting submissions for “Things & Time”, a book length, short story anthology, to be released in 2013. Deadline for submissions is August 1, 2013. Projected publication date is October of 2013. This anthology of short fiction will be published in electronic book form, spanning multiple formats.

We are seeking original, unpublished fiction with a direct thematic connection to the Caribbean, or the Caribbean Diaspora. Accepted works must not have been previously published in print or digitally (online or e-book formats). All genres are welcome, as long as they meet the previously stated criteria of a connection to the Caribbean or Caribbean Diaspora. Simultaneous submissions are not accepted.

Please submit short fiction of 3,000 to 6,000 words, as an email attachment. Email submissions only will be accepted. Failure to comply with requested word count or to provide submission as an attachment will result in automatic disqualification. Your submission should be single spaced, with block paragraph formatting.  You may send multiple submissions, but only one per email.

Send your submissions to submissions@stsomewherepress.com with the subject line: Submission – Fiction Anthology. Include your name, email address and a brief bio in both the body of your email and in the attached document.

No monetary compensation is being offered for this anthology. Upon publication, contributing authors will be given unlimited access to download electronic copies of the anthology for a two week period of time.

Upon acceptance, St. Somewhere Press assumes first serial rights to all submissions. The copyright automatically reverts to author upon publication. All work may be permanently archived online by St. Somewhere Press and St. Somewhere Press retains the non-exclusive rights to republish accepted works in alternate, or new, formats. Any subsequent publication of accepted works by their authors must properly cite St. Somewhere Press as the original publisher of the work.

http://stsomewherepress.blogspot.com/p/submissions.html
http://www.stsomewherepress.com/

Do you have a Dream Journal? Crazy Caribbean Fantasy

Excerpt from an unfinished novel:

Michael’s dreams taunted him. There was a world in his sleep that disappeared when he awoke. Even though he kept a pen and pad on his night stand, he was never quick enough, strong enough, and talented enough to capture his dreams. When he was asleep, he could manipulate words; he created plots and crafted stories so beautiful, so exciting that he was sure they would be recited for generations…but as soon as he opened his eyes they all disappeared and he was left staring at pages of disjointed sentences and nonsensical stories.

Taken from Patsy, Coming no time soon…

I was inspired to write this post because of a crazy adventure dream I had last night.

I was in a rainforest in Guyana with some friends. The task was to reach a part of the island, within some time frame (yes even my dreams have some kind of structure) and apparently I was the only person shocked by these strange creatures in the Caribbean, whose sole task was to prevent us from reaching the sacred bush and get a tasty human entrée in the process.

We fought every creature – some of them physically- but most of the time it was a battle of wit and strategy versus strength. My Guyanese friends would give me a rundown description of the creatures, what their weaknesses were etc., while they stood there and waited until we finished (Yes they are monsters, but that is no reason to be rude).

Continue reading